Bean Strike

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Phaseolus vulgaris

Stringless, smooth beans are medium green in color. Strike is known for its concentrated pod set; great for canning. Widely adapted, disease resistant variety. White seeds.

Beans are tender annuals in the Leguminosae family, which also includes garbanzos, peas, lentils, and peanuts.

Dry beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) - These varieties are grown for the mature bean seed. Dry beans have both bush and pole growth habits. 

Beans only require average fertility and prefer pH in the 6.0 - 6.8 range. Choose well drained, warm soils and use inoculants to increase yields where natural Rhizobia populations are low. 

When possible, wait for dry conditions before handling plants. 

Pole beans require trellising for support. Plant in single or double rows, or a circle for a tripod trellis. 

Harvest early and often to increase yields. Remove oversized beans to maintain pod production. Dry beans are harvested once in the fall, when plants are drying down. Harvest by hand or machine, using either a combine or a stationary thresher. Avoid harvesting moldy pods whenever possible, and make sure beans are completely dry before threshing.

Dry further in cool, dry conditions prior to long-term storage. Beans are ready for storage when seed coat can not be dented by fingernail. Store beans in a cool dry place. 

Aphids can be washed off plants with a hard stream of water. They have several natural predators that control populations including parasites (aphids appear grey or bloated), lady beetle larvae and lacewings.

Leafhoppers are small wedge shaped insects that suck the juice from leaves rather than eating holes through them. If leaves are yellowing and curling under, examine the underside for leafhoppers. 

Root rot, caused by several different soil-borne fungi, can be prevented by rotating with a cereal or pasture crop and by planting into soil temperatures above 60°F. Root rot is less of a problem where soil is warm and well-drained. 

White mold, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, causes a pod and stem blight and is generally a disease of cool, damp conditions. Do not handle plants during wet conditions. Wider spacing can allow more aeration between plants and help control the spread of disease. White mold survives in soil and plant debris; therefore infected plants should be removed from the field. Dry beans and soybeans are not as susceptible to white mold as snap beans. Crop rotation is essential.

Grown and potted using: Organic heirloom open pollinated seed, organic nutrient rich soil (vg), 80mm biodegradable certified organic wood chip pot (no transplanting required).